Available courses

There’s an old Northern saying ‘Where there’s muck, there’s brass’. It’s an indication that when people get their hands dirty they usually made money. This applied on the small scale to individuals and even on the large scale to whole communities or even areas of our country. During this Course I want you to discover some of the economic geology on your doorstep, or in your own backyard. In some cases this will literally be so, in others, it will be down the street, on a nearby derelict site,strange diggings in old woodland or in the built environment of your locality.

A few years ago we celebrated the 200th anniversary of the publication of William Smith’s geological map of England and Wales. For the very first time we were able to see something of the immense amount of time it has taken to form and shape these islands. Since then, many more people has added pieces to that jigsaw of geological time, such that we now know that the beginnings of Britain go back 3 billion years!
This course takes a closer look at the rocks and the scenery of selected parts of Britain and at the people who have helped us to unravel their fascinating story. We’ll be taking a journey through our past and using the rocks, the maps and the scenery to help us to discover more. No previous knowledge is expected or a required, just a sense of adventure!


“Around the world in 10 great geological stories” is a 10- week course that will take a look at some of the world’s finest geology. It begins with a look at Iceland and how our interpretation has radically changed in the last few years. Also covered are: The Channel Isles, The Himalayas, fabulous fossils from China, Cyprus, The Grand Canyon, The Rockies and Montserrat.

An online course for anyone interested in the geological history of the British Isles. A bumpy ride that commences around 3 billion years ago. You’ll have to endure violent volcanoes, plate collisions, warm coral reefs,steaming equatorial forests, hot dry deserts and ice ages before we eventually arrive at the present day. 

If you’re like me and want to know more about fossils in a more relaxed way, this course if for you. I want you to contribute to the course and have fun along the way. By the end of it we’ll all be wiser and hopefully know more about fossils.

For the past four years our Summer School has been the highlight of our calendar of field trips.  We didn’t want you to miss out even during the pandemic, so we invented our ‘virtual summer school’. 

Every day during this week we’ll be hosting a packed programme of live chat, talks, presentations and work units across a wide spectrum of subjects.  We’ll even get you outside exploring the geology in your own backyard!  You can learn how to read and understand geological maps, hear about an active volcano on the island of Montserrat or a long extinct one in Charnwood Forest.  Explore an active fluorspar mine in Derbyshire and understand the greatest extinction event of them all!

 Anyone can enrol and take part – we look forward to welcoming YOU to our virtual summer school.


You’ll have gathered from the somewhat quirky title of this course that we are going to be looking at sedimentary rocks and the processes that made them. It’s a story in time, deep geological time, with many of the rocks having been formed millions of years ago. But how long did it take to form what we see? Were the sediments accumulating slowly, or were they formed very quickly?

This course takes a closer look at the rocks and the scenery of selected parts of Britain and at some of the people who have helped us to unravel their fascinating story. We’ll be taking a journey through our past and using the rocks, the maps and the scenery to help us to discover more. No previous knowledge is expected or a required, just a sense of adventure.


The story of the geology of these islands is one of the most intriguing and complex that can be told with a ‘plot’ involving numerous ‘characters’ who seem to have a nasty habit of exiting stage left or right and then turning up again when you least expect them!  It’s all a result of our tiny bit of planet Earth having been in the thick of the action as plates moved apart and then crashed into each other on many occasions.  It’s a story that covers more than 3 billion of the Earth’s 4.6 billion years.

Over the coming weeks we’re going to be exploring the geology of “God’s own county” - Yorkshire.  In the best traditions we may stray across the border into Teesside, rather like Yorkshire County Cricket Club for these are rocks that were ‘born in Yorkshire’.

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of William Smith’sgeological map of England and Wales. For the very first time we were able to see something of the immense amount of time it has taken to form and shape these islands. Since then, many more people has added pieces to that jigsaw of geological time, such that we now know that the beginnings of Britain go back 3 billion years!

This course takes a closer look at the rocks and the scenery of selected parts of Britain and at the people who have helped us to unravel their fascinating story. We’ll be taking a journey through our past and using the rocks, the maps and the scenery to help us to discover more. No previous knowledge is expected or a required, just a sense of adventure!

Over the coming weeks we’re going to be exploring the basics of our planet. We begin at the beginning some 4,650 million years ago and go on to examine what the Earth is made of and how it works; the story of life on the planet and much, much more.

Are you sitting comfortably? Are you ready for this? We're going to consider the geological history of the British Isles in a day. Come along to our sessions both here on Moodle and on Zoom. From the earliest rocks of 3.1 Billion years ago to the rocks forming recently they all'll be covered.